Tag: frappes and fiction

January 2022 Wrap-Up: Why Is It 2022 Already?

Hello and welcome to another post in which I give a lengthy summary of my month that no one wants to read but which I will use to walk down memory lane in future years.

“Don’t Read the Reviews”: Social Conformity, Hype Trains and How Reviews Might Influence Your Bookish Opinions

This might be sacrilegious for me to say as a book blogger, but we all know book reviews are something of a squishy, subjective business.

Book Review: Project Hail Mary by Andy Weir

I waited, rather impatiently, for a LONG time before my hold on this book became available and well, at least I can say those painful 2.5 months weren’t for nothing!

Monday Mini-Reviews: Seven Brief Lessons on Physics and The Interstellar Age

How are you all? I’m just a bit stressed today because school starts in two weeks, my code is not working and I’ve been working on my college applications while struggling to decide what I even want in life!

5 Oddly Specific Categories of Fiction Books You Have Definitely Read | Recent Bookish Trends

If you stick to one genre, reading can get boring. Why? Because the book world is not immune to trend-hopping. Publishers want to sell books, so they publish what sells, leading to a myriad of interesting– but sometimes repetitive– trends.

Monday Mini-Reviews: In Order to Live and Maybe You Should Talk to Someone

Maybe Frappes & Fiction is slowly becoming Frappes & Nonfiction, but today I’m bringing you reviews for two more nonfiction books: In Order to Live by Yeonmi Park and Maybe You Should Talk to Someone by Lori Gottlieb.

Why I DON’T Use Trigger Warnings In My Book Reviews

In the relatively brief time I’ve been a part of the book hemisphere of the Internet, I’ve noticed a trend gaining traction among book reviewers: trigger warnings.

5 Nonfiction Books I Couldn’t Put Down| Science, History Book Recommendations

Nonfiction gets a bad rap. So many people (including past me) automatically dismiss it as “boring”, but lately I’ve come to realize that nonfiction is only boring if you’re not reading the right books.